inlimbo - all messages by user

24/04/2012 18:06:23
Voice actors? We need em. Please check out the voice of the police officer in my short the "The Jumper" or the husband in the picture frame of "Close Up." That's my voice, and if you have any needs, I can record it for a variety of character types. Thanks.
04/02/2012 18:36:02
Future of Muvizu after BETA They will likely never charge in the future (unless you are on the cusp of making a lot of money with your Muvizu made movie). Also, you can download and archive each release and ensure that you will always have a free version. Ultimately you could look at it another way:

Most free animation products will not compare to Muvizu, and you might as well get started with one piece of software (whether it is Muvizu or something else). You might consider just making a movie. Don't talk yourself out of making movies and learning how to make them. Don't wait!

Also, you will always have to learn or relearn features in any piece of software. This is true of free or paid software. Whether you switch to a new program or have to learn newly added features to software you've been using. When you learn 3D movie making programs and also the principles of good filmmaking you will have skills that transcend individual programs. You can easily learn new apps and be on your way.

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edited by inlimbo on 04/02/2012
16/09/2011 17:37:21
Newbie.... St. Patrick's Day in 2014 is on Monday, the 17th of March.

Is this your honest-best guess? Or is this a joke?

My question was a real question.


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edited by inlimbo on 16/09/2011
15/09/2011 18:51:29
Newbie....
We're going to someday have characters holding props.

That sounds terrific! When will someday be (plus or minus 4 months). Make a rough estimate here, the community will not bite if you're off by a few yards.

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edited by inlimbo on 15/09/2011
25/08/2011 23:56:20
prOp Animations ...Or even one new stride?
11/08/2011 02:23:21
prOp Animations Perhaps one or two new strides?
05/08/2011 22:30:44
prOp Animations Any new strides or projected dates toward when we can see a beer pint in someone's hands?

Cheers.
15/06/2011 20:48:25
Facial animation Yes for sure ... neutral states and basic/neutral motions are very welcome! If Muvizu had an index of basic moves (generic jump, crawl, kneel, lean on table, turn and look left, pick up object from table, etc.) that would cover most bases, that would be great. Even having basic facial emotions would be good. So an annoyed look to be held on the timeline for 3 seconds before transitioning into a neutral expression to be held for 10 seconds. That would do wonders.

Now have I mentioned anything about the need for being able to handle props????
24/05/2011 01:41:42
prOp Animations I'll just have to wait then! For the record, I'm not sure about desperate...but rather I'm pretty stubborn! And even though I'm not the one working late hours over there and I don't have the right to gripe, I just don't see how it would be an equal amount of work.

I mean, it seems like there are tons of temporary stuff already in Muvizu. Even the way Musical Instruments is done, they aren't real props, and one can't set them down or pick them up. I so wished Muvizu had started with basic prOps first, and then moved to the specific niche of Musical instruments.

I guess I’ll keep on wishing and pleading and squeaking. Thanks for your innovations and development so far. Cheers

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edited by inlimbo on 24/05/2011
23/05/2011 18:27:45
prOp Animations Thanks Neil 4 ur post! I do wish to make clear though that what Barry addressed was my initial post. My latest suggestion is an even more temporary workaround, and while not super easy, has got to be easier than the initial posts.

Hand Props SMUGGLED in as Wrist Accessories...It's a cheat...a work around...it's different. As long as we can rotate and move them to the palm like head accessories...it works.

I realize your brave men and women are cranking away, and thanks for that, but please take the time to give your feedback on this new variant of prOp Solutions. Also, Dreeko...what do you think?

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edited by inlimbo on 23/05/2011
19/05/2011 04:54:25
prOp Animations Thx Ziggy/Mysto. Excited to see if wrist accessories for props is something Muvizu can get behind.
19/05/2011 01:04:58
Muvizu movie Vote I like dark comedies myself. I like the whole process, but if I'm working with others I could write.
18/05/2011 21:52:22
prOp Animations So how about it Muvizu?! Can we get wrist accessories as a temporary solution to prop handling?

We could have a flashlight, a cup, a small ball, a gun, a book, and a pen (maybe a key, a coin, and a knife too) as wrist accessories with movable and rotatable attributes, so we could reposition them to the palm. This would cover a few situations and increase the types of stories told.

To make it even more interesting, and a little further down the road, you could give both accessories AND objects a visibility attribute.

This is the way props are sometimes done in Maya, like when a ball is thrown. A sphere is attached to the palm, and when the character throws and releases it, the ball's visibility is set to 0 in the time line. Then a second ball, an object not attached the character, has its visibility brought up to 1 from 0, and the ball is then animated in the air.
16/05/2011 18:05:23
prOp Animations Another thought on temporary solutions to handling PrOps: Why not create the ability to reposition wrist accessories? (and make some of those accessories a pen, a mug, a ball, and yes a gun.)

In one movie I made a blue tooth by repositioning a mustache, a monocle, and a mystery item to the character's ear.

What if there were wrist accessories that could be repositioned to the palm and would follow along with the character's animations and hand gestures? If there were enough "GRIP" poses and animations (and there are some) then stuff might be able to sim prop usage.

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edited by inlimbo on 16/05/2011
09/05/2011 18:19:15
prOp Animations Hello Barry and all of Muvizu Team,

Just following up on this one. There are a lot of stories that can't easily be told without handling props, and would suffer from a filmmaker's attempts to fake it. When you are done with the engine update, please let me know where do you see it on your long list?

I've probably mentioned before that both iClown and MovieTempest handle props. There are lots of people who may not attempt to use your software because of this one issue.

The more people who use your software, the more innovation and good films begin to rise to the surface and the more recognition Muvizu has.

I'm ranting again, but for a good cause: Muvizu. The longer Muvizu is without this feature, the more we have to rely on dialogue to drive stories, and iClown users will likely stay put.

Thanks.

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edited by inlimbo on 09/05/2011
05/05/2011 23:16:14
Scriptwriting competition I agree with Ziggy on most bad and good movies come from America.

Although, to be fair, Beavis and Butthead fall into the category of sketch in my humble opinion. Even though they fill out half hour episodes or even their feature length movie, they are really a series of sketches tied together. It is also a sub-category of sketch, parody. The very characters themselves are poking fun at half of America. Within the stupidity there’s also a lot more nuance there than you might expect.

By the way, analyzing where bad movies went wrong is very helpful, and analyzing where good movies go right is even more instructive. What are your favorite movies, and why do you think they worked?

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edited by inlimbo on 06/05/2011
05/05/2011 00:32:23
Scriptwriting competition Thanks for your post. I can't entirely agree with you on American movies. The following American movies are just a sample of outstanding pictures from the States:

The Hurt Locker
No Country for Old Men
True Grit
and
The Fighter

I completely agree with the heart of your post. "The audience has to want to see the protagonist get what they want." There are many factors that go into this, but mostly the audience has to empathize with the main character(s), even if they are a criminal. One of the many ways to do this is to show vulnerability in the character. Their honesty of emotion is what can draw us into them. It doesn't matter if they come from a different walk of life than we do. If they have faults and behaviors like us, and also react and FEEL like we do then our eyes are glued.
04/05/2011 18:31:38
Scriptwriting competition I also forgot to mention there are different goals for a sketch versus a traditional story.

There is some overlap, but if you had a competition you should have at least those two different categories.

This is a gross oversimplification: In a more traditional story, the protagonist is trying get what they want, and has to overcome obstacles to solve this problem. In sketch the characters aren't solving a problem, unless they are the straight character, they are wallowing in absurdity. Their absurdity becomes more and more pronounced until it hits a crescendo.

It's the difference between Monty Python and the great short Kiwi:
04/05/2011 18:19:27
Scriptwriting competition I would say the length of project depends on what kind of movie you're trying to make. At the same time it's good to note that if you write your scripts in script format (on software like the free celtx) that one page is roughly equivalent to one minute of screentime.

If you are writing a sketch, which muvizu might be best suited for at the moment, then 3 minutes max should be the goal. A minute and a half might yield a great economical sketch, but be careful being too short. If you rush or cut things that should be there that's another undesirable extreme.

If you are writing a more traditional story, and it's a short, then 4-10 minutes is a good range. There really is no limit in any genre. All guidelines and suggestions for duration can be broken for the right piece. If you write a good 90 minute feature length script, we will all watch. Maybe for streaming purposes it would be good to break it up, I don't know.

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edited by inlimbo on 04/05/2011
11/03/2011 18:07:16
Jim's last day Good Luck Jim. Thanks for your help.
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